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Kansas City Prostitution Defense Attorneys

In Kansas and every state in the U.S.—besides some parts of Nevada—it is against the law to engage in prostitution. In addition, it is illegal to pay someone to perform a sexual act or enter a place where prostitution occurs with the intention to engage in a sex act with a prostitute, which is known as patronizing.

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Patronizing

In Kansas, patronizing, which is also known as soliciting a prostitute, is considered a criminal offense. It is defined as the act of paying or offering to pay someone for the purpose of engaging in sexual activity.

As you mentioned, patronizing is classified as a class A misdemeanor for a first offense, which carries a maximum penalty of one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500. Repeat offenses are considered a severity level 9 felony, which carries a more severe penalty, including longer prison sentences and higher fines.

However, it is legal to hire an escort for nonsexual purposes in Kansas. If a person is charged with patronizing, they may argue that the alleged prostitute was not hired for sexual activity, but instead for companionship or other nonsexual services. This can be a difficult defense to prove, and it is important for individuals accused of patronizing to seek legal representation from an experienced criminal defense attorney who can help them build a strong defense.

Prostitution

In Kansas, prostitution is considered a criminal offense and is defined as the act of engaging in sexual activity or sexual contact in exchange for money or other forms of compensation. It is classified as a class B misdemeanor, which carries a maximum penalty of six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

It's important to note that if a person facing a prostitution charge is a human trafficking victim or under the age of 18, they can use this as an affirmative defense to the criminal charges. This means that they can argue that they were forced or coerced into engaging in prostitution and should not be held responsible for the crime.

It is also important to note that there are other defenses that can be used in prostitution cases, such as entrapment, lack of intent, and the absence of sexual conduct. These defenses will depend on the specific facts of each case and it is important for individuals facing prostitution charges to seek legal representation from an experienced criminal defense attorney who can help them build a strong defense.

Promoting Prostitution by Running a Brothel or Recruiting Prostitutes.

In Kansas, promoting prostitution is considered a criminal offense and is defined as the act of facilitating or profiting from prostitution. This can include running a brothel, recruiting prostitutes, or otherwise making money from the sale of sexual services.

Promoting prostitution is considered a severity level 9 felony for a first offense and carries a maximum penalty of 13 months in prison. Repeat offenses are considered a severity level 7 felony, which carries a more severe penalty, including a maximum 26 months in prison.

It's important to note that in order to be convicted of promoting prostitution, the prosecution must prove that the defendant was aware that prostitution was taking place. If the defendant was not aware of such upon arrest, they cannot be charged with promoting prostitution.

In simple terms, promoting prostitution means to make money from prostitution or to facilitate it by running a brothel or recruiting people to engage in prostitution. If you're found guilty of promoting prostitution, you'll face severe penalties including prison time. To be convicted, the prosecution must prove that you were aware that prostitution was taking place. If you were not aware that prostitution was happening, you can't be charged with promoting prostitution.

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